Other Sources

Life in Turkey Now: Tough Talk, but Fears of Drug Shortages

World News (NY Times) - Fri, 17 Aug 2018 - 6:23am
The lira’s plunge, exacerbated by a dispute with the U.S. over a detained pastor, has exposed growing economic pressures that some economists say could be near a breaking point.

Argentina tango festival: International competition underway

Al Jazeera - Fri, 17 Aug 2018 - 6:17am
It's time for Tango! An international festival celebrating the Latin American dance opens in Buenos Aires.

Iraq says its warplanes killed 28 ISIL members in eastern Syria

Al Jazeera - Fri, 17 Aug 2018 - 6:11am
Iraqi military says it struck potential suicide bombers who intended to strike during next week's Eid al-Adha holiday.

Melting Ice Uncovers 1946 Wreckage of U.S. Plane in Swiss Glacier

World News (NY Times) - Fri, 17 Aug 2018 - 5:17am
Parts of the aircraft, which made a crash landing more than 70 years ago, recall the death-defying rescue of the 12 Americans onboard.

If you Put an old W. Bush crony in Charge of Iran Policy, doesn’t it Signal a War-Like Intention?

Informed Comment - Fri, 17 Aug 2018 - 2:50am

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has appointed Brian H. Hook, the State Department director of policy planning, to head a coordinated “Iran Action Group.”

Hook served in several important posts in the George W. Bush administration, indicating his support for lying the country into war with Iraq and the years-long US military occupation of that country. Putting a Bushie Neoconservative in charge of the Iran Action Group can fairly be seen as a signal that Pompeo wants to do to President Hassan Rouhani what Bush did to Saddam Hussein.

The Iraq War led to the deaths of hundreds of thousands, the wounding of millions, the creation of hundreds of thousands of widows and orphans, the displacement of 4 million Iraqis, the complete destruction of the Iraqi economy, and the rise of the ISIL terrorist group.

A Neoconservative, Hook has argued for coddling dictatorial regimes favorable to US interests such as the absolute monarchy Saudi Arabia and the brutal military junta in Egypt, rather than pressing them in any way on human rights or democracy. He blamed Jimmy Carter’s human rights policy for the revolutions in Nicaragua and Iran (an allegation almost completely divorced from any historical fact). He seems to imply that pressing a country over democratization should be reserved as a tactic for governments the US does not like.

Hook was likely involved in the memo for Trump arguing for promoting an “Islamic reformation,” which State Department experts on the Middle East privately castigated: ““These people are curating crap” from the far-right, anti-Muslim blogosphere, said a separate senior U.S. government official, referring to the unnamed authors of the State Department paper,” according to The Intercept. Hooks appears to equate the government of Iran with the terrorist group al-Qaeda. You don’t have to like the Iranian government to think that that is ridiculous.

So we’ve got someone who has defended Bush’s war of aggression on Iraq but who thinks it was naive and dangerous for Carter to cut aid to the Argentinian colonels who were throwing dissidents out of airplanes.

Nice.

——

Bonus video:

PBS NewsHour: ” U.S. Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo will announce the creation of the Iran Action Group”

Serena Williams learned just before Johanna Konta loss that half-sister's killer had been freed

BBC News - Fri, 17 Aug 2018 - 1:57am
Serena Williams says she discovered her half-sister's killer had been released on parole just minutes before suffering the worst defeat of her career.

Former CIA Head Brennan: Trump Trying to Obstruct Russia Probe w/ Denial of Security Clearance

Informed Comment - Fri, 17 Aug 2018 - 1:56am

Washington (AFP) – America’s former top spy has alleged he was stripped of his security clearance in a bid by President Donald Trump to scare critics and stymie an investigation into ties with Russia.

In a searing opinion article published in the New York Times on Thursday, ex-CIA director John Brennan said Trump’s decision to remove his security clearance was politically motivated.

“Mr. Trump clearly has become more desperate to protect himself and those close to him,” said Brennan, seeing “an attempt to scare into silence others who might dare to challenge him.”

Brennan, who was until January 2017 the guardian of America’s most closely held secrets, stridently dismissed Trump’s claims that his campaign did not work with Russia to win the 2016 election.

“Mr. Trump’s claims of no collusion are, in a word, hogwash,” he said.

“The only questions that remain are whether the collusion that took place constituted criminally liable conspiracy, whether obstruction of justice occurred to cover up any collusion or conspiracy, and how many members of ‘Trump Incorporated’ attempted to defraud the government by laundering and concealing the movement of money into their pockets.”

Even by the standards of angry Trump-era criticism, Brennan’s words represent an unprecedented attack by America’s normally hush-hush spooks on a political leader.

In an interview with the Wall Street Journal, Trump admitted his decision on Brennan’s clearance was linked to the ongoing Russia probe.

“I call it the rigged witch hunt, [it] is a sham, Trump was quoted as saying “and these people led it!”

“So I think it’s something that had to be done,” he added.

Featured Photo: AFP/File / JIM WATSON. Former Central Intelligence Agency director John Brennan says US President Donald Trump’s assertions of “no collusion” with Russia’s meddling in the 2016 US elections are “hogwash”.

Palestinian Mail Reaches the West Bank, 8 Years Late

World News (NY Times) - Fri, 17 Aug 2018 - 1:56am
Ten tons of letters and packages, which Israel had prevented from entering the Palestinian territory of the West Bank, have finally been released.

Danish Politician Pwns terminally Ignorant Trish Regan of Fox on “Socialism” (Video)

Informed Comment - Fri, 17 Aug 2018 - 1:44am

Now This News (Video Clip)

Fox News tried coming after Denmark’s social safety net. This Danish politician’s clap back was legendary.

Now This: ” Fox News Tried Going After Denmark. Big Mistake. | NowThis

Aretha Franklin’s Reminder to Trump Era: Women, Minorities, Humans owed R E S P E C T (Video)

Informed Comment - Fri, 17 Aug 2018 - 1:24am
    The Guardian: “Aretha Franklin, who has died at the age of 76, reflects on her 1967 cover hit Respect in a collection of archive clips. The queen of soul discusses how she and her sister injected Otis Redding’s song with their own twist and its subsequent use as a ‘battle cry’ and ‘women’s anthem’

1.

Guardian News: ” ‘A women’s anthem’: Aretha Franklin on Respect”

2.

Aretha Franklin – Respect [1967] (Original Version)

Author Reza Aslan threatened by Israeli Border Authorities with Family Separation

Informed Comment - Fri, 17 Aug 2018 - 1:09am

BETHLEHEM (Ma’an) — Shin Bet, Israel’s internal security agency, detained Iranian-American writer, Reza Aslan, as he was entering Israel through Jordan, with his family.

Reza Aslan, 46, took to his Twitter account, where he said that the Shin Bet used police state tactics against him and his family.

Aslan arrived in Israel with his wife, children, and in-laws after a visit to Jordan. Upon his arrival, he was separated from his family at the border and detained by the Shin Bet, which repeatedly threatened him .

He wrote in his Twitter post that the Shin Bet interrogator threatened him by repeatedly saying “we can make it so you don’t see your kids for a long time.”

Aslan mentioned that “the police state part began in earnest: Write down names of journalists you associate with. Write down names of Palestinian organizations you support.”

According to Aslan, he tried to cooperate as best as he could, but was accused of lying after answering each question.

The Shin Bet interrogator warned Aslan not to enter the Palestinian territories, not to meet with or speak to any Palestinians or any Israeli troublemakers and warned him by saying that “we are watching you,” Aslan wrote.

Aslan concluded his tweets by saying that “this was my 4th trip to Israel in ten years and every time it’s gotten worse. It’s becoming unrecognizable as a democracy. It is becoming a full-blown police state.”

Aslan’s tweets were triggered when American-Jewish journalist and commentator, Peter Beinart, 47, was also detained by the Israeli Shin Bet at Ben Gurion Israeli airport and interrogated about his political views and involvement in political activities that threaten democracy or promote violence.

Beinart, who considers himself a supporter of Israel, has publicly criticized the Israeli government’s policies toward the Palestinian people and its close alliance with United States President Donald Trump.

Following his interrogation, Beinart said in a statement “my hope would be that this provokes a conversation more generally about the way in which Israel harasses people based on their political views. The real scandal is what happens to people who are much more vulnerable than me because they don’t have the privilege that I have as an American Jew.”

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s office released a statement saying that upon learning of Beinart’s detention, he immediately asked Shin Bet officials about what happened and labeled it as an “administrative mistake.”

The Shin Bet later apologized for causing any distress saying that it was investigating the incident.

Netanyahu’s office mentioned that “Israel is an open society which welcomes all—critics and supporters alike. Israel is the only country in the Middle East where people voice their opinions freely and robustly.”

This statement contradicts the newly approved controversial Nationality Law, that Netanyahu showed full support for, in which the law enshrines the status of the State of Israel as the nation state of the Jewish people. Hence, non-Jewish citizens of Israel are already classified as “second class” citizens.

Featured Photo: h/t Wikimedia

Our Thirty Years War of the 21st Century

Informed Comment - Fri, 17 Aug 2018 - 12:55am

New York (Tomdispatch.com) – Fair warning. Stop reading right now if you want, because I’m going to repeat myself. What choice do I have, since my subject is the Afghan War (America’s second Afghan War, no less)? I began writing about that war in October 2001, almost 17 years ago, just after the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan. That was how I inadvertently launched the unnamed listserv that would, a year later, become TomDispatch. Given the website’s continuing focus on America’s forever wars (a phrase I first used in 2010), what choice have I had but to write about Afghanistan ever since?

So think of this as the war piece to end all war pieces. And let the repetition begin!

Here, for instance, is what I wrote about our Afghan War in 2008, almost seven years after it began, when the U.S. Air Force took out a bridal party, including the bride herself and at least 26 other women and children en route to an Afghan wedding. And that would be just one of eight U.S. wedding strikes I toted up by the end of 2013 in three countries, Afghanistan, Iraq, and Yemen, that killed almost 300 potential revelers. “We have become a nation of wedding crashers,” I wrote, “the uninvited guests who arrived under false pretenses, tore up the place, offered nary an apology, and refused to go home.”

Here’s what I wrote about Afghanistan in 2009, while considering the metrics of “a war gone to hell”: “While Americans argue feverishly and angrily over what kind of money, if any, to put into health care, or decaying infrastructure, or other key places of need, until recently just about no one in the mainstream raised a peep about the fact that, for nearly eight years (not to say much of the last three decades), we’ve been pouring billions of dollars, American military know-how, and American lives into a black hole in Afghanistan that is, at least in significant part, of our own creation.”

Here’s what I wrote in 2010, thinking about how “forever war” had entered the bloodstream of the twenty-first-century U.S. military (in a passage in which you’ll notice a name that became more familiar in the Trump era): “And let’s not leave out the Army’s incessant planning for the distant future embodied in a recently published report, ‘Operating Concept, 2016-2028,’ overseen by Brigadier General H.R. McMaster, a senior adviser to Gen. David Petraeus. It opts to ditch ‘Buck Rogers’ visions of futuristic war, and instead to imagine counterinsurgency operations, grimly referred to as ‘wars of exhaustion,’ in one, two, many Afghanistans to the distant horizon.”

Here’s what I wrote in 2012, when Afghanistan had superseded Vietnam as the longest war in American history: “Washington has gotten itself into a situation on the Eurasian mainland so vexing and perplexing that Vietnam has finally been left in the dust. In fact, if you hadn’t noticed — and weirdly enough no one has — that former war finally seems to have all but vanished.”

Here’s what I wrote in 2015, thinking about the American taxpayer dollars that had, in the preceding years, gone into Afghan “roads to nowhere, ghost soldiers, and a $43 million gas station” built in the middle of nowhere, rather than into this country: “Clearly, Washington had gone to war like a drunk on a bender, while the domestic infrastructure began to fray. At $109 billion by 2014, the American reconstruction program in Afghanistan was already, in today’s dollars, larger than the Marshall Plan (which helped put all of devastated Western Europe back on its feet after World War II) and still the country was a shambles.”

And here’s what I wrote last year thinking about the nature of our never-ending war there: “Right now, Washington is whistling past the graveyard. In Afghanistan and Pakistan the question is no longer whether the U.S. is in command, but whether it can get out in time. If not, the Russians, the Chinese, the Iranians, the Indians, who exactly will ride to our rescue? Perhaps it would be more prudent to stop hanging out in graveyards. They are, after all, meant for burials, not resurrections.”

And that’s just to dip a toe into my writings on America’s all-time most never-ending war.

What Happened After History Ended

If, at this point, you’re still reading, I consider it a miracle. After all, most Americans hardly seem to notice that the war in Afghanistan is still going on. To the extent that they’re paying attention at all, the public would, it seems, like U.S. troops to come home and the war to end.

That conflict, however, simply stumbles on amid continuing bad news with nary a soul in the streets to protest it. The longer it goes on, the less — here in this country at least — it seems to be happening (if, that is, you aren’t one of the 15,000 American troops stationed there or among their families and friends or the vets, their families and friends, who have been gravely damaged by their tours of duty in Kabul and beyond).

And if you’re being honest, can you really blame the public for losing interest in a war that they largely no longer fight, a war that they’re in no way called on to support (other than to idolize the troops who do fight it), a war that they’re in no way mobilized for or against? In the age of the Internet, who has an attention span of 17 years, especially when the president just tweeted out his 47th outrageous comment of the week?

If you stop to think about it between those tweets, don’t you find it just a tad grim that, close enough to two decades later, this country is still fighting fruitlessly in a land once known by the ominous sobriquet “the graveyard of empires”? You know, the one whose tribal fighters outlasted Alexander the Great, the Mongols, the British, and the Russians.

Back in October 2001, you might have thought that the history lurking in that phrase would have given George W. Bush’s top officials pause before they decided to go after not just Osama bin Laden and al-Qaeda in Afghanistan but the Taliban, too. No such luck, of course — then or since.

They were, of course, leading the planet’s last superpower, the only one left when the Soviet Union imploded after its Afghan war disaster, the one its leader, Mikhail Gorbachev, grimly dubbed “the bleeding wound.” They hadn’t the slightest doubt that the United States was exempt from history, that everyone else had already filled that proverbial graveyard and that there would never be a gravestone for them. After all, the U.S. was still standing, seemingly triumphant, when history officially “ended” (according to one of the neocon prophets of that moment).

In reality, when it comes to America’s spreading wars, especially the one in Afghanistan, history didn’t end at all. It just stumbled onto some graveyard version of a Möbius strip. In contrast to the past empires that found they ultimately couldn’t defeat Afghanistan’s insurgent tribal warriors, the U.S. has — as Bush administration officials suspected at the time — proven unique. Just not in the way they imagined.

Their dreams couldn’t have been more ambitious. As they launched the invasion of Afghanistan, they were already looking past the triumph to come to Saddam Hussein’s Iraq and the glories that would follow once his regime had been “decapitated,” once U.S. forces, the most technologically advanced ever, were stationed for an eternity in the heart of the oil heartlands of the Greater Middle East. Not that anyone remembers anymore, but Dick Cheney, Donald Rumsfeld, Paul Wolfowitz, Douglas Feith, and the rest of that crew of geopolitical dreamers wanted it all.

What they got was no less unique in history: a great power at the seeming height of its strength and glory, with destructive capabilities beyond imagining and a military unmatched on the planet, unable to score a single decisive victory across an increasingly large swath of the planet or impose its will, however brutally, on seemingly far weaker, less well-armed opponents. They could not conquer, subdue, control, pacify, or win the hearts and minds or anything else of enemies who often fought their trillion-dollar foe using weaponry valued at the price of a pizza. Talk about bleeding wounds!

A War of Abysmal Repetition

Thought of another way, the U.S. military is now heading into record territory in Afghanistan. In the mid-1970s, the rare American who had heard of that country knew it only as a stop on the hippie trail. If you had then told anyone here that, by 2018, the U.S. would have been at war there for 27 years (1979-1989 and 2001-2018), he or she would have laughed in your face. And yet here we are, approaching the mark for one of Europe’s longest, most brutal struggles, the Thirty Years’ War of the seventeenth century. Imagine that.

And just in case you’re paying no attention at all to the news from Afghanistan these days, rest assured that you don’t have to. You already know it!

To offer just a few examples, the New York Times recently revealed a new Trump administration plan to get U.S.-backed Afghan troops to withdraw from parts of the countryside, ceding yet more territory to the Taliban, to better guard the nation’s cities. Here was the headline used: “Newest U.S. Strategy in Afghanistan Mirrors Past Plans for Retreat.” (“The withdrawal resembles strategies embraced by both the Bush and Obama administrations that have started and stuttered over the nearly 17-year war.”) And that generally is about as new as it gets when it comes to Afghan news in 2018.

Consider, for instance, a report from early July that began, “An American service member was killed and two others were wounded in southern Afghanistan on Saturday in what officials described as an ‘apparent insider attack’”; that is, he was killed by an armed Afghan government soldier, an ally, not an enemy. As it happened, I was writing about just such “insider” or “green-on-blue” violence back in July 2012 (when it was rampant) under the headline “Death by Ally” (“a message written in blood that no one wants to hear”). And despite many steps taken to protect U.S. advisers and other personnel from such attacks since, they’re still happening six years later.

Or consider the report, “Counternarcotics: Lessons from the U.S. Experience in Afghanistan,” issued this June by the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan (SIGAR). Its focus: 15 years of American efforts to suppress opium growing and the heroin trade in that country (at historic lows, by the way, when the U.S. invaded in 2001). More than eight and a half billion American dollars later, SIGAR found, opium remains the country’s largest cash crop, supporting “590,000 full-time jobs — which is more people than are employed by Afghanistan’s military and security forces.” Oh, wait, historian Alfred McCoy was writing about just that at TomDispatch back in 2010 under the headline “Can Anyone Pacify the World’s Number One Narco-State?” (“In ways that have escaped most observers, the Obama administration is now trapped in an endless cycle of drugs and death in Afghanistan from which there is neither an easy end nor an obvious exit.”)

Recently, SIGAR issued another report, this one on the rampant corruption inside just about every part of the Afghan government and its security forces, which are famously filled with scads of “ghost soldiers.” How timely, given that Ann Jones was focused on that very subject, endemic corruption in Afghanistan, at TomDispatch back in… hmmm, 2006, when she wrote, “During the last five years, the U.S. and many other donor nations pledged billions of dollars to Afghanistan, yet Afghans keep asking: ‘Where did the money go?’ American taxpayers should be asking the same question. The official answer is that donor funds are lost to Afghan corruption. But shady Afghans, accustomed to two-bit bribes, are learning how big-bucks corruption really works from the masters of the world.”

I could, of course, go on to discuss “surges” — the latest being the Trump administration’s mini-one to bring U.S. troop levels there to 15,000 — such surges having been a dime-a-dozen phenomena in these many years. Or the recent ramping up of the air war there (essentially reported with the same headlines you could have found over articles in… well… 2010) or the amount of territory the Taliban now controls (at record levels 17 years after that crew was pushed out of the last Afghan city they controlled), but why go on? You get the point.

Almost 17 years and, coincidentally enough, 17 U.S. commanders later, think of it as a war of abysmal repetition. Just about everything in the U.S. manual of military tactics has evidently been tried (including dropping “the mother of all bombs,” the largest non-nuclear munition in that military’s arsenal), often time and again, and nothing has even faintly done the trick — to which the Pentagon’s response is invariably a version of the classic misquoted movie line, “Play it again, Sam.”

And yet, amid all that repetition, people are still dying; Afghans and others are being uprooted and displaced across Asia, South Asia, the Middle East, and deep into Africa; wars and terror outfits are spreading. And here’s a simple enough fact that’s worth repeating: the endless, painfully ignored failure of the U.S. military (and civilian) effort in Afghanistan is where it all began and where it seems never to end.

A Victory for Whom?

Every now and then, there’s the odd bit of news that reminds you we don’t have to be in a world of repetition. Every now and then, you see something and wonder whether it might not represent a new development, one that possibly could lead out of (or far deeper into) the graveyard of empires.

As a start, though it’s been easy to forget in these years, other countries are affected by the ongoing disaster of a war in Afghanistan. Think, for instance, of Pakistan (with a newly elected, somewhat Trumpian president who has been a critic of America’s Afghan War and of U.S. drone strikes in his country), Iran, China, and Russia. So here’s something I can’t remember seeing in the news before: the military intelligence chiefs of those four countries all met recently in Islamabad, the Pakistani capital, officially to discuss the growth of Islamic State-branded insurgents in Afghanistan. But who knows what was really being discussed? And the same applies to the visit of Iran’s armed forces chief of staff to Pakistan in July and the return visit of that country’s chief of staff to Iran in early August. I can’t tell you what’s going on, only that these are not the typically repetitive stories of the last 17 years.

And hard as it might be to believe, even when it comes to U.S. policy, there’s been the odd headline that might pass for new. Take the recent private, direct talks with the Taliban in Qatar’s capital, Doha, initiated by the Trump administration and seemingly ongoing. They might — or might not — represent something new, as might President Trump himself, who, as far as anyone can tell, doesn’t think that Afghanistan is “the right war.” He has, from time to time, even indicated that he might be in favor of ending the American role, of “getting the hell out of there,” as he reportedly told Senator Rand Paul, and that’s unique in itself (though he and his advisers seem to be raring to go when it comes to what could be the next Afghanistan: Iran).

But should the man who would never want to be known as the president who lost the longest war in American history try to follow through on a withdrawal plan, he’s likely to have a few problems on his hands. Above all, the Pentagon and the country’s field commanders seem to be hooked on America’s “infinite” wars. They exhibit not the slightest urge to stop them. The Afghan War and the others that have flowed from it represent both their raison d’être and their meal ticket. They represent the only thing the U.S. military knows how to do in this century. And one thing is guaranteed: if they don’t agree with the president on a withdrawal strategy, they have the power and ability to make a man who would do anything to avoid marring his own image as a winnner look worse than you could possibly imagine. Despite that military’s supposedly apolitical role in this country’s affairs, its leaders are uniquely capable of blocking any attempt to end the Afghan War.

And with that in mind, almost 17 years later, don’t think that victory is out of the question either. Every day that the U.S. military stays in Afghanistan is indeed a victory for… well, not George W. Bush, or Barack Obama, and certainly not Donald Trump, but the now long-dead Osama bin Laden. The calculation couldn’t be simpler. Thanks to his “precision” weaponry — those 19 suicidal hijackers in commercial jets — the nearly 17 years of wars he’s sparked across much of the Muslim world cost a man from one of Saudi Arabia’s wealthiest families a mere $400,000 to $500,000. They’ve cost American taxpayers, minimally, $5.6 trillion dollars with no end in sight. And every day the Afghan War and the others that have followed from it continue is but another triumphant day for him and his followers.

A sad footnote to this history of extreme repetition: I wish this essay, as its title suggests, were indeed the war piece to end all war pieces. Unfortunately, it’s a reasonable bet that, in August 2019, or August 2020, not to speak of August 2021, I’ll be repeating all of this yet again.

Tom Engelhardt is a co-founder of the American Empire Project and the author of a history of the Cold War, The End of Victory Culture. He is a fellow of the Nation Institute and runs TomDispatch.com. His sixth and latest book is A Nation Unmade by War (Dispatch Books).

Follow TomDispatch on Twitter and join us on Facebook. Check out the newest Dispatch Books, Beverly Gologorsky’s novel Every Body Has a Story and Tom Engelhardt’s A Nation Unmade by War, as well as Alfred McCoy’s In the Shadows of the American Century: The Rise and Decline of U.S. Global Power, John Dower’s The Violent American Century: War and Terror Since World War II, and John Feffer’s dystopian novel Splinterlands.

Copyright 2018 Tom Engelhardt

[Note for TomDispatch Readers: Given my piece today, it seems an appropriate moment to remind TD readers that my new book, A Nation Unmade by War, on the very subject Americans generally prefer to avoid thinking about (see below), is now wandering the universe. I hope you’ll consider picking up a copy. In addition, you can always get a signed, personalized copy by going to our donation page, contributing $100 ($125 if you live outside the U.S.), and so help keep this website chugging along in our increasingly strange world. Tom]

Via Tomdispatch.com

—–

Bonus video added by Informed Comment:

Gunmen Besiege Intelligence Facility In Kabul, Afghanistan Mourns Victims Of Suicide Bombing | TIME

E-cigarettes can be key weapon against smoking, say MPs

BBC News - Thu, 16 Aug 2018 - 11:56pm
Vaping is much less harmful than normal cigarettes and it shouldn't be treated the same way, MPs warn.

Atal Bihari Vajpayee, Former Prime Minister of India, Dies at 93

World News (NY Times) - Thu, 16 Aug 2018 - 11:35pm
As India’s leader from 1998 to 2004, Mr. Vajpayee ended a long moratorium on nuclear tests but also eased tensions with Pakistan and built closer ties with United States.

Revoking James Comey’s security clearance could be a federal crime for Trump says MSNBC analyst

The Raw Story - Thu, 16 Aug 2018 - 10:59pm

President Donald Trump has said that he revoked the security clearance of former CIA director John Brennan because of his comments on the investigation into Trump’s collusion with Russia during the 2016 election. In the case of Trump’s retaliation against Brennan, who is retired, there i...

The post Revoking James Comey’s security clearance could be a federal crime for Trump says MSNBC analyst appeared first on Raw Story.

For Some Viewers, ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Is Not Asian Enough

World News (NY Times) - Thu, 16 Aug 2018 - 10:44pm
In Singapore, where the film was largely shot, detractors say the cast is unrepresentative of diversity in the city-state.

How to Spruce Up for Asian Games? Cover a Polluted River

World News (NY Times) - Thu, 16 Aug 2018 - 10:44pm
The so-called Black River has been hidden by a nylon net with lights atop it so athletes don’t see one of Jakarta’s more embarrassing eyesores.

Whistleblower complaint accuses Tesla of spying on employees at Nevada battery factory: attorney

The Raw Story - Thu, 16 Aug 2018 - 10:27pm

An employee fired from Tesla Inc’s (TSLA.O) Nevada battery factory filed a whistleblower complaint with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, accusing the company of spying on employees and failing to act after learning that a Mexican cartel may be dealing drugs inside the plant, his attorney...

The post Whistleblower complaint accuses Tesla of spying on employees at Nevada battery factory: attorney appeared first on Raw Story.

Ecuador and Peru tighten entry requirements to slow influx of Venezuelan economic migrants

The Raw Story - Thu, 16 Aug 2018 - 10:21pm

Venezuelans entering Ecuador and Peru will soon be required to show their passports, rather than national identity cards, the Ecuadorean government and Peruvian official sources said on Thursday, amid concerns over an influx of economic migrants. Ecuador and Peru have hitherto allowed Venezuelans to...

The post Ecuador and Peru tighten entry requirements to slow influx of Venezuelan economic migrants appeared first on Raw Story.

Radio 1's Greg James on breakfast and battling Taylor Swift fans

BBC News - Thu, 16 Aug 2018 - 10:17pm
The 32-year-old begins hosting the Radio 1 breakfast show from Monday.
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